3 Questions Your Lawyer Will Ask During Estate Planning Process

HomeLegal Services Blog3 Questions Your Lawyer Will Ask During Estate Planning Process

Here at Piervincenti & Tarantino Law, PLLC, we understand that, while necessary, the estate planning process can be an emotionally challenging time–after all, it’s never pleasant to think about your own mortality. Our team wants to help you make this process as painless as possible, and one of the best ways to do that is to help you start thinking about some of the questions that will come up ahead of time so that you’re not blindsided in the moment. In this article, we’ll go over three questions that your estate planning lawyer will ask during the process so that you can have your answers prepared.

3 Questions Your Lawyer Will Ask During Estate Planning Process

  1. Who will care for your children? One of the most difficult estate planning questions to grapple with is who will care for your children if both of their parents die–in fact, many people tell us at Piervincenti & Tarantino Law, PLLC that this question was so painful that they held off making estate plans until their children were grown. Of course, no one can guarantee that nothing will happen to them while their children are still growing up, so it’s always better to make this decision, just in case.
  2. Who will care for your pets? Although not everyone will love their pets as intensely as their human family members, you’ll still want to make sure that your pets are cared for in your absence. Pet care does cost money, so part of your estate plan should set aside funds to ensure that your animal companion can live out their days in comfort.
  3. Have you disclosed all of your descendants? A third question that will come up during the estate planning process concerns your descendants–specifically, we urge you to be completely honest and disclose the name of every There have been many cases in which a previously unknown child comes forward after the funeral, which creates significant emotional conflict for the surviving family members. To avoid this, it’s best to disclose any secrets ahead of time and make plans accordingly.